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Hackers break into Sarah Palin’s inbox!

UPDATE: For a follow-up on the situation, see here.

It appears the infamous group of cyber-mischief makers “anonymous” are up to their old tricks, and this time they had Governor Palin in their sights.

While this has not been completely confirmed, it seems that some time over night or early this morning, somebody was able to compromise “gov.palin@yahoo.com,” by apparently discovering the password to the account.  The password was posted to a public forum, 4chan.org, and a field day ensued.  Within a short time, another “anonymous” had changed the password on the account to effectively lock everybody else out, and later this morning the account had been locked completely by Yahoo.

Anonymous is the same group responsible for such stunts as the NFL dirty bomb threat in October 2006, and has more recently been behind organized global protests of Scientology.

Just last week, the Washington Post published an article about Sarah Palin’s use of this very same Yahoo e-mail account.  Palin’s use of a public e-mail service rather than the secure state e-mail system raised some eyebrows, as she was potentially communicating about sensitive matters, off the record, on a third party service.  Arguing that she should be using the secure and encrypted state e-mail system, an activist in her state had called for the release of her e-mails.

Well, it looks like lawyers won’t be necessary, as “anonymous” might have done the job for them.

The images below were posted to a Photobucket account owned by a user named “anoncrack.”  They include a message to Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell, a message of encouragement from Amy McCorkell (a member of Palin’s Advisory Board on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse in Alaska), general screen shots of Palin’s inbox, a message from the “anonymous” who apparently tried to close off access to Palin’s inbox, and some family photos that were found in attachments.

UPDATE: 2:00PM EST, Wired News is now reporting this story, and has received confirmation from Amy McCorkell that she indeed sent the message that appears in one of the screen shots.