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YAK Car Pic of the Day

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

In case you’ve been living under a rock for the past 50 years or so, I’ll inform you that this is a 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air four-door sedan. (If you need a refresher, here’s a link to the Canadian brochure.) Looks like at one point it was Dusky Rose, but I’m seeing some green on the bottom of the driver’s door and front fender. This sedan is probably the least popular model amongst collectors, which may explain the paltry $4,500 OBO asking price on the front window. I took this photo in the Town of Yorkshire almost five years ago. Hmm, I wonder if it ever sold.

Jim Corbran • YouAutoKnow jim@artvoice.com


YAK Car Pic of the Day

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

If I recall correctly, this 1967 Ford Mustang resided under a shed with a multitude of other interesting ’60s and ’70s iron when I took this photo over four years ago. The peripheral vision really had to kick in that day, as these things were tucked w-a-y back off the road down in the Town of Yorkshire. I have no statistics to prove it, but I’m sure this tan-ish color was rare (I’m guessing it was the Pebble Beige), as it seems to be more of a sedan color than something purportedly sporty. I remember working at a Buick dealer, where many folks “of a certain age” really liked this shade because they were sure it “never showed the dirt.” Well, maybe not the beige dirt, anyway.

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know

jim@artvoice.com


YAK Car Pic of the Day

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The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. So they say. Likewise, the absence of some of its parts is greater because of the hole which is left behind. So says me. And here’s the perfect example: a 1966 Ford Thunderbird which has been raided by some restorer who needed a front fender and the very expensive back bumper/taillight assembly. I just can’t believe this thing is still wearing those cool spinner wheel covers. I think they’d look great on the YAKmobile. I’ll have to take another ride down to this Yorkshire wrecking yard and see if they’re still there.

a bit more intact

a bit more intact

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know


YAK Car Pic of the Day

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The things you see when you look off the side of the road. Like this 1968 Ford Mustang. Parts car? Abandoned project? Or maybe just parked and forgotten about. At any rate, there were almost a quarter-million of the hardtop coupe model produced for 1968, the second year of the Mustang’s first restyle. They were nowhere near as popular as the original 1965s (over 600,000 produced), but other pony car manufacturers would have loved to have had sales numbers like this. For the model year 1968, Plymouth sold a total of 45,412 of all Barracuda models, AMC sold around 56,00 Javelins, while Chevy sold 235,115 Camaros. Mustang’s total of hardtops, fastbacks, and convertibles was 317,404. Not too shabby. This one was seen down in Yorkshire. (And if you’re wondering, that’s a 1966 Thunderbird perched on a ledge behind the Mustang.)

—Jim Corbran, You Auto Know…


YAK Car Pic of the Day

'67 Ford F-100, Yorkshire, N.Y.

Although this 1967 Ford F-100 (as half-tons were called back then) looks likes it’s wearing a Texas paint job (and maybe it is), it was actually spotted a while back in a used car lot in the Town of Yorkshire. It’s funny how pickups have evolved since then. Check out some of the “features” touted in the Canadian Ford/Mercury pickup brochure from that year: molded fiberboard glovebox with push-button latch; attractive, functional instrument cluster; and one-piece, easy-to-keep-clean hardboard headlining. No wonder the Ford half-ton pickup morphed into the best-seller that it is today!

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know


Wheels In the Grass

1957 Cadillac hardtop coupe, Yorkshire, N.Y.

Recently came across this Dusty Rose 1957 Cadillac Series 62 hardtop coupe sitting in the brush behind a collision shop in the town of Yorkshire, N.Y., where it is well back off the road. Kind of rough-looking, but something you don’t see every day. With most of the trim missing, it was hard to tell whether it was  a Coupe de Ville ($5,116) or a regular Series 62 ($4,677). De Villes were, of course, the more luxurious of the two, but not the most luxurious Cadillac back in 1957. There were also the Series 60 hardtop sedan, with a wheelbase of 133 in., three-and-a-half inches longer than the 62s ($5,614); the $13,000 Series 70 Eldorado Brougham (wb 129 in.), which was the most expensive non-limousine American car made that year; and the Series 75 eight-passenger sedan and limousine (wb 149.8 in.), which both sold in the $7,500 range. Cadillac sold almost 147,000 cars that year, well ahead of the competition: only 41,567 Lincolns & Continentals, and a mere 37,593 Imperials.

from the brochure

…Jim Corbran, You Auto Know

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