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YAK Car Pic of the Day

Why don’t we have model names today like this 1949 Oldsmobile Futuramic 88 club coupe? Everybody these days likes gadgets, so you’d figure with a name like “Futuramic” you’d be right on top of things. The 88 came equipped with the Olds Rocket V-8 engine – another reason to run out and buy one. Go ahead, impress the neighbors! This suede black number with the chrome-reverses and Baby Moons was seen some time ago in East Aurora.

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know

jim@artvoice.com

 


YAK Car Pic of the Day

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Ironically (possibly), this 1981-84 AMC Eagle was parked just off the lot of the Made in America Store in East Aurora last week. Starting in 1984 AMC moved production from its Kenosha, Wisconsin plant to a plant in Brampton, Ontario Canada. The Eagle, you may remember, was American Motors’ last gasp before driving off into history, built for model years 1980-88 with variants based on the Concord and the Gremlin/Spirit. These cars were basically the AMC sedans and wagons plopped down onto Jeep running gear. Kind of the same concept as many of today’s crossovers. Perhaps AMC was just ahead of its time?

of course a wood-grained version was offered

of course a wood-grained version was offered

 

here's the Gremlin/Spirit-based Kammback

here’s the Gremlin/Spirit-based Kammback

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know


YAK Car Pic of the Day

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Just in case this 1949 Plymouth DeLuxe four-door isn’t fancy enough for you, take solace in knowing that you could have spent another 88 bucks and come home with the Special DeLuxe. Which would have gotten you… what? I don’t know. Even the brochure is very vague. But  every ’49 Plymouth had a “Silent Hypoid Semi-floating (rear axle) with Amola and Nickel Molybdenum steel.” Well dang! Where do I sign? This black sedan, with a roof high enough for any gentleman to wear a hat in, was seen a while back in an East Aurora yard. See them all here in the sepia-toned brochure.

brochure illustration makes it look limousine-like

brochure illustration makes it look limousine-like in length

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know


YAK Car Pic of the Day

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Here’s a 1979 Ford Ranchero, the final year (so far) for the car/truck originally built on a 1957 Ford station wagon platform. These were popular back in the day with folks who needed a (very) light pickup with a bit of style. Later they seemed to be more popular with customizers and hot rodders, and they’re still being produced in Australia in big numbers. Below is a photo of a customized Ranchero made by mating the front half/interior bits from a Mercury Cougar with a Ranchero. Probably one-of-a-kind. Read about it here at wildaboutcarsonline.com. Today’s Pic Car was seen a while back in East Aurora — so long ago that the photo was taken out the window of the previous YAKmobile.

Cougaranchero

Cougaranchero

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know

 


YAK Car Pic of the Day

Back when this 1953 Chrysler Windsor Deluxe was new, its styling was thought to be a bit “stodgy,” especially when compared to the General Motors offerings of the day. Looking at it some 60 years later, I’d say it was — well, stodgy. Boxy, upright, unaerodynamic — call it what you will, it was pretty unexciting. Perhaps a two- or three-tone paint job in some brighter colors would put some more interesting lipstick on this pig, but, too bad for Chrysler that they still had one more year to go before the truly exciting 1955 models came out. The rest, as they say, is history. This one was spotted some time ago just outside the Village of East Aurora.

Brighter colors helped. A little.

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know


YAK Car Pic of the Day

'58 Edsel Ranger, East Aurora, N.Y.

Lowest of the low? This 1958 Edsel Ranger was the marque’s bottom series, perched just below the Pacer. These two series were based on Ford’s body shell, while higher-priced Corsair and Citation models were based on the larger Mercury bodies. When Ford was trying to come up with a name for the Edsel, they recruited poet Marianne Moore for some suggestions. One of my favorites from her list is Utopian Turtletop. Either Moore had no concept about what might sell; had a great sense of humor; or knew instinctively that it didn’t matter what they called this thing because it was dead on arrival.  This interesting example was seen in the parking lot of an East Aurora repair shop a couple of summers ago. (Waiting for parts?)

— Jim Corbran, You Auto Know